Joe’s Simple Saturation can be used to quickly saturate or desaturate video images towards several pre-defined color channel targets. Each of the color channels in an image can be used as targets for saturation adjustments, each producing unique results. For additional saturation and desaturation options, try Joe’s Saturation & Colorize which can target any hue on the color wheel.

Example Images

Joe's Simple Saturation
Original Image


The examples below show the different results of each source setting at a fixed saturation setting. Different colors are represented by variable shades of gray in their respective color channels. For example Yellow color areas appears nearly black when using Blue as a source beauase yellow is made up of only red and green light.

Saturation: 0

Joe's Simple Saturation
Gray
Joe's Simple Saturation
Luma
Joe's Simple Saturation
Red
Joe's Simple Saturation
Green
Joe's Simple Saturation
Blue

Saturation: 50

Joe's Simple Saturation
Gray
Joe's Simple Saturation
Luma
Joe's Simple Saturation
Red
Joe's Simple Saturation
Green
Joe's Simple Saturation
Blue

Saturation: 150

Joe's Simple Saturation
Gray
Joe's Simple Saturation
Luma
Joe's Simple Saturation
Red
Joe's Simple Saturation
Green
Joe's Simple Saturation
Blue

Out of Range Colors

The Saturation controls in Joe’s Noise – Saturation can produce colors well outside of the broadcast safe gamut. At high Saturation values, the entire image will likely be illegal. If you’re end product is going to broadcast, stay away from the high-end of the Saturation input and check your output levels.

Controls

Joe's Simple Saturation Controls
Source
Determines which channel or set of channels to use as the basis of the saturation adjustment. Gray is a 33% mix of all channels, Luma uses the YUV weighted average.
Saturation (0 – 1000%)
Sets the amount of saturation change. At 0%, the image is completely desaturated, at 100% the image is unchanged, values above 100% increase the saturation of colors.

A note about Channels

Joe’s Simple Saturation uses a 3×3 matrix to calculate output channels instead of a channel copy because the matrix operations were noticeably faster. Because of this, there may be a slight discrepancy between the outputs and the original source channel.

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